The Form Factor Email

From: Danica Lyons

To: Aaron Simon

Sent: 7/23/2014 2:30pm

Subject: Form factor

 

Hi,

This seems to be a good time to remind people that “form factor” is not hyphenated, even when it looks like it’s being used as an adjective. The term form factor is a noun.

According to Wikipedia, “n computing, the form factor is the specification of a motherboard – the dimensions, power supply type, location of mounting holes, number of ports on the back panel, etc.”

Please do not hyphenate when it appears it is being used as an adjective, as in “General purpose, two-socket, standard form factor boards.” The adjectives in this case are “General purpose, two-socket, standard” describing the “form factor boards” as the noun.

Thanks!

Danica Lyons

Team Lead

Web Editor Group

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Aaron Simon

To: Danica Lyons

Sent: 7/23/2014 3:00pm

Subject: RE: Form factor

Hi Danica,

I understand where you’re coming from, and, indeed, where Wikipedia is coming from in its definition, but I think we’re missing something very important.

What about the intent of the phrase in its appearance?

Thanks,

Aaron

Web Editor

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Danica Lyons

To: Aaron Simon

Sent: 7/23/2014 3:15pm

Subject RE: RE: Form factor

What?

Team Lead

Web Editor Group

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Aaron Simon

To: Danica Lyons

Sent: 7/23/2014 3:20pm

Subject: RE: RE: RE: Form factor

Hi Danica,

Let me extrapolate.

We live in a time where quantum physics has seriously undermined what you might think of as the “real” world. For example, most of what we consider to be “solid” objects are actually empty space. They’re held together by subatomic particles, that then make up protons, neutrons, and electrons, which—of course—make up elements. I bring up this fundamental fact to illustrate the idea that everything is not what it seems.

Now, from there, we must consider the idea that not only is our fundamental understanding of “reality” flawed, but so might be our fundamental understanding of “ideas.” Is it possible that “ideas” have as much intent as what we perceive ourselves to have? After all, there runs a school of thought that says that, due to the nature of the universe, we actually have no free will. All things run on a predetermined course. If that is true, then can we say that we have ideas? Would it not be more accurate to say that, in reality, we move along a predetermined path and just fill out roles, like actors on a stage?

Coupled with that, we must think about the possibility of parallel universes. This, according to many physicists, is a perfectly valid theory. If they are correct, then every choice you make has an alternative in some other universe. (For the sake of ease, let’s assume that you’re only working with binary choices, so for each choice you make, there’s another universe where you made the other choice. On that note, let’s further assume that those universes run completely parallel and do not involve that other you making choices that have come up as a result of making another choice that cropped up because of the first choice that was made.)

From there, we must ask the question: If this is all the case, what if there were, at some point in the distant, distant past, some choice that was made by some entity (perhaps God) to allow ideas to have intent. Is it not inconceivable that this hypothetical universe could, occasionally, intertwine with our own? After all, if we have a binary pair of universes that share these “choice points,” as I’ll call them, then, at some point, they might interact, thanks to the choices made by the entities within the universes. So, in thinking about all that, we should consider whether or not the idea of “form factor” has as its intent the being-as-self of not being hyphenated.

As a company that values individual choice and prides itself on being inclusive, then it is my opinion that we should embrace all spellings of “form factor” (or “form-factor”) in order to continue to be seen as an industry leader in ethical best practices. If you’d like, I can bring this up to human relations.

I’m also considering drafting an e-mail to corporate about forming “idea relations,” in light of our enlightening discussion today.

Best,

Aaron

Web Editor

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Olaf Christianson

To: Aaron Simon

Sent: 7/23/2014 4:38pm

Subject: Outlook Invitation: Drug Screening

Hi Aaron,

You’ve been selected as a random participant in a corporate drug screening initiative. Please see your on-site administrator to set up a time to participate.

As a friendly reminder, WDC Development Corp, LLC has a zero tolerance policy on illicit substances. In the event that such substances are discovered in your system, we will move to terminate your employment immediately.  I’m sure that won’t be an issue, though.

Best,

Olaf Christianson

Head of Human Relations

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Aaron Simon

To: Olaf Christianson

Sent: 7/23/2014 4:44 pm

Subject: RE: Outlook Invitation: Drug Screening

[Rejected]
—-

From: Olaf Christianson

To: Aaron Simon

Sent: 7/23/2014 4:45 pm

Subject: RE: RE: Outlook Invitation: Drug Screening

Your participation is mandatory.

Olaf Christianson

Head of Human Relations

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Aaron Simon

To: Olaf Christianson

Sent: 7/23/2014 4:48 pm

Subject: RE: RE: RE: Outlook Invitation: Drug Screening

Is this because of Israel’s actions in the Gaza Strip? I may be Jewish, but that’s no reason for you to target me.

Aaron

Web Editor

WDC Development Corp, LLC

—-

From: Olaf Christianson

To: Aaron Simon

Sent: 7/23/2014 4:50 pm

Subject: CANCELED: Outlook Invitation: Drug Screening

Oh wow

I just realized that there’s a very big spider web on this site, so I reckon I’ll jump in, clean it off a bit with a blog post, and then frolic on off to… do whatever it is that I need to do today.

It’s been a stupid busy eight months. Since getting the job I’m currently in, I’ve been commuting at least two hours a day, ramping up for what is, so far, a pretty successful relaunch of the Cards: The Attackening! Kickstarter, and trying to have some semblance of a social life on top of all of that.

In addition to that, I’m finally back on my 1,000 words a day schedule, starting at 6:00 in the morning. A long time ago, I found out that if I don’t get my writing done before 10 in the morning, then I’m useless. Now, what with having to leave my place by 7:00 most days, that means my time is incredibly limited. But! It’s worked out so far.

“But Aaron, what have you been working on?”

Aside from the C:TA! Kickstarter, I’ve been working on the third part of my post-apocalyptic beast of a book–that, I think, is currently living on Mt St Helens because of reasons reasons–a long-form piece about the Portland con scene that is in desperate need of some editing, a longish primer on classical music, and a series of stories called “The Estimable Adventures of Dr. Chiu.” 

“But Aaron, what are you doing with all of that?”

None of your business. Have patience.

Oh, also: I’ve been learning JavaScript and Drupal. Also Selenium

So yeah. I see other people, like, twice a month, now. (Business, work, and going to the store excluded.)

Much busy. Such productivity. Wow.

So, that’s what I’ve been up to. How about you?!

An Open Letter to the Spam Bots Infesting My Blog

Dear Spam Bots,

 

Good morning. I am, of course, aware that I have not been posting as much as I should be on this site. I am, after all, paying for the domain. I should at least use it. I get it. I really do! Further, I thank you for your posts, because every time I get an e-mail reminder from WordPress that I should moderate the spam that’s been infesting my blog, it’s a reminder that I should also post to the blog.

It’s not for want of material! There’s a lot out there that I want to write about. Indeed, I have been writing. I swear! I’m about 25k words in on a primer on classical music for a friend. I’ve been working on a long-form article about conventions in Portland’s gaming scene. I’ve been working on fiction, too–trust me on that. It’s just, you know, there’s only so many hours in the day, and with a 1.5 hour commute (at the least) every day, I can’t really get time to update my blog. If I did, I’d have to give up my more in-depth writing projects, and I’m just not willing to do that.

Yes, I know, you’re basically my only audience. This may very well be your only way of saying that. Your bizarre, non-English posts might be a way of saying, “Aaron! Post! We miss reading your thoughts as we break through WordPress’s horrible spam-catching infrastructure.” If so, message received, comrades! There’s no need to continue posting on my Documentation article. Or the Christmas Letter from two years ago. Please stop. You’re filling up my inbox too much, and I hate having to cultivate that thing.

So, look. Okay. I’ll post more to this thing. I really will. Just stop. Please?

Yours,

Aaron Simon